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Showing Elizabeth Harris

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Elizabeth Harris’s upbringing on an cattle ranch, north of Fort St John BC results in the of exploration of environmentalism and existentialism. Harris’ work includes paintings, ceramics as functional and sculptural and multi-media installations . Harris’ education includes the University of Emily Carr Art and Design, and has worked as an independent arts instructor, mentor, and facilitator of studios and societies. She has exhibited extensively at public and private galleries as an invitational and represented artist.

"I was born in the Peace River Country, and spent my formative years on a cattle ranch. I have been educated at Emily Carr University of Art and Design, and have developed a strong background in facilitation of artist environments within society structures and independent studios and galleries. I have taught adult art education throughout British Columbia, and exhibit widely in both private and public galleries with work that reflects my ideas of relevance.

My art is an idiosyncratic mix of contemporary aspirations and conceptual leanings with undercurrents of rural stoicism. I am a multi media artist, and have found, that the ability to create dialogue in several mediums is what keeps my work alive. My conversations in art are an extrospective view of everyday life, with emphasis on the significance of nature."


ABOUT RAKU:
Raku is derived from an ancient Japanese method of ceramic firing, the effects can range from stunning metallic to subtle earth colours. The unique patterns and finish comes from the oxidization of the burning materials and interplay of flames, smoke and rapid cooling. Raku is a type of low-firing process that was inspired by traditional Japanese raku firing. Western-style raku usually involves removing pottery from the kiln while at bright red heat and placing it into containers with combustible materials. Once the materials ignite, the containers are closed. This produces an intense reduction atmosphere which effects the colors in glazes and clay bodies. The effects range from matt to shiny jewel tones.

Education

BFA at Emily Carr University