BEAR - CIPOLLA, COLE, LEMAY, MARTIN

Includes Susie Cipolla, Richard Cole, Robert Lemay, Sarah Martin
Saturday March 3, 2 - 5 pm

Showing Elizabeth Harris

BEAR - CIPOLLA, COLE, LEMAY, MARTIN

Presenting both established and emerging artists in this exhibition Canada House Gallery offers a diverse glimpse at a loved and revered subject – BEAR. Situated in Canada’s First National Park and a World UNESCO Heritage site, we adore all that makes our place sacred, and that includes our wildlife. Bears represent the whole of nature, and we cherish their safety, their habitat, their future.

Richard Cole and Robert Lemay have been anchor artists at CHG for years, yet the BEAR is a relatively new subject for them. We are pleased to welcome emerging artists, Susie Cipolla & Sarah Martin to the gallery and our collectors and show how BEAR inspires them in their work.

A portion of the proceeds will go towards WildSmart; a program of the Biosphere Institute of the Bow Valley, a non-profit charitable organization. Established in 2005, WildSmart is a proactive conservation strategy that encourages efforts by communities to reduce negative human-wildlife interactions. Their goal is to develop a coordinated approach to education/outreach programs and help support direct management activities that will aid in increasing public safety and enjoyment as well as contribute towards sustainable wildlife populations.

The funds that you will be donating to WildSmart will be used to recruit and train new volunteers for their Wildlife Ambassador Program. Come meet Nick de Ruyter, WildSmart Education and Outreach Coordinator, at the reception.

No artwork is currently available for display online.

Elizabeth Harris’s upbringing on an cattle ranch, north of Fort St John BC results in the of exploration of environmentalism and existentialism. Harris’ work includes paintings, ceramics as functional and sculptural and multi-media installations . Harris’ education includes the University of Emily Carr Art and Design, and has worked as an independent arts instructor, mentor, and facilitator of studios and societies. She has exhibited extensively at public and private galleries as an invitational and represented artist.

"I was born in the Peace River Country, and spent my formative years on a cattle ranch. I have been educated at Emily Carr University of Art and Design, and have developed a strong background in facilitation of artist environments within society structures and independent studios and galleries. I have taught adult art education throughout British Columbia, and exhibit widely in both private and public galleries with work that reflects my ideas of relevance.

My art is an idiosyncratic mix of contemporary aspirations and conceptual leanings with undercurrents of rural stoicism. I am a multi media artist, and have found, that the ability to create dialogue in several mediums is what keeps my work alive. My conversations in art are an extrospective view of everyday life, with emphasis on the significance of nature."


ABOUT RAKU:
Raku is derived from an ancient Japanese method of ceramic firing, the effects can range from stunning metallic to subtle earth colours. The unique patterns and finish comes from the oxidization of the burning materials and interplay of flames, smoke and rapid cooling. Raku is a type of low-firing process that was inspired by traditional Japanese raku firing. Western-style raku usually involves removing pottery from the kiln while at bright red heat and placing it into containers with combustible materials. Once the materials ignite, the containers are closed. This produces an intense reduction atmosphere which effects the colors in glazes and clay bodies. The effects range from matt to shiny jewel tones.

Education

BFA at Emily Carr University